Search

Jamie Davis Writes

Category

Haunted Hotels

Ghost Hunter’s Journal Now on Sale on Amazon

The Ghost Hunter’s Journal is a softcover ruled, indexed notebook journal that contains 200 pages to help keep you organized when documenting all of your ghost adventures. You can purchase your copy for just $12.99 on Amazon!

Ghost-Hunter's-Journal
Ghost Hunter’s Journal

The indexing system aids in reflection and planning throughout the year. The pages contain sections for the Who / What / When & Where details of your ghost hunts; followed by sections for: hotspots of the area and building that you are investigating; legends & lore; equipment used; and weather. The following page contains a full section for your notes.

The last few pages of the indexed book journal come with marked pages that have been indexed for you. Sample topics include: Best of (every month); Most Overrated; Equipment to Buy; Places to Visit – Bucket List (with one page completed as a suggested travel list based on my own travel research from my first two books).

 

Ghost-Hunter's-journal-interior-pages
Interior pages of the Ghost Hunter’s Journal, with bonus index and sample content pages.

Make sure to check out P. 197 for a recommended beginning bucket list of paranormal places to explore! I included places investigated for America’s Most Haunted Hotels and Haunted Asylums, Prisons, and Sanatoriums.

Ghost-hunter's-journal-bucket-list

Each indexed book journal features 200 ruled pages that are numbered for your ease of use. The numbered pages with an index will help keep you organized and make it easy to find your important entries. To really make your brain sing, we recommend that you use tabs and update your book journal’s index as necessary immediately after you have completed your journaling.

Specs: black and white interior ink, 200 ruled, indexed, and numbered pages.

Advertisements

Garnet Ghost Town – MT

“Never built to last.” Yet last it did.

A short look into MT’s most intact ghost town. Gold ore boomtown circa 1898 – population 1,000. By 1905, only 150 remained.

Arriving at Garnest Ghost Town.jpg
Arriving – Garnet Ghost Town
Welcome - Garnet Ghost Town.jpg
Welcome – Garnet Ghost Town
Outside 1.jpg
Outside

 

Outside.jpg

Looking In.jpg
Looking In
UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_488.jpg
Okay, we know that I am wearing a green jacket, and it has been reflected back in the above photo. So who is this in the window all in black?! (We think it is the back side of Bob).

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_48f.jpg

More Looks In.jpg

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_493.jpg

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_49a.jpg

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_49b.jpg
J.H. Wells Hotel

And yes, I think it is haunted!

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_497.jpg
Outside looking in – J.H. Wells Hotel (Garnet Ghost Town)

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_4a0.jpg

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_4a1.jpg

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_4a8.jpg
Inside the old Garnet Jail

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_4aa.jpg

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_4ad.jpgUNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_4b0.jpg

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_4b2.jpg

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_4b3.jpg
Back view of the J.H. Wells Hotel – Garnet Ghost Town

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_4b4.jpg

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_4b5.jpg

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_4b6.jpg

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_4b9.jpgUNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_4be.jpgUNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_4c1.jpg

UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_4c5.jpg
Flooded mine shaft – Garnet Ghost Town

As always, we were sure to update our analog travel journal. We use “Play” by Stealth Journals. “Play” is an indexed book journal that should be used to record all of your good times!

Ghost Adventures, Aftershocks – Jerome Grand Hotel and Rolling Hills Asylum

Nothing kicks off a holiday weekend like giving Amazon more of my money, so I placed my $1.99 orders and saddled up to the old computer to catch up on what I’ve been missing on the paranormal show front in this year’s Season 3 episodes of “Ghost Adventures, Aftershocks.”

Jerome Grand street view

I love to watch the shows that cover places I’ve been to myself. The Jerome Grand Hotel episode had me wanting more footage of the actual hotel. Chris Altherr gave a very heartfelt recounting of his saving Bagans from the descending elevator (the same one where Claude Harvey died). Lonnie Anderson, and his wife, Renee, were fun to catch up with through the show, and I liked that they actually gave a positive story of an additional encounter that Lonnie experienced in his shop (located inside the Clubhouse). Kim Brasher, I can’t even talk to you right now, but I will be sending you a signed author’s copy of “America’s Most Haunted Hotel,” here in the next few weeks to thank you for the interview you gave us.

Rolling Hills Asylum
Rolling Hills Asylum

As to Rolling Hills, there were two new photos that I had not seen before that I found quite compelling. One was said to be of Roy, and the image showed a man’s torso, but not his legs. He was “standing” in front of a desk. If the photo were of a visitor, the legs of the desk would not have shown through! The other was a “scary” white face image outside the window of Emma’s room (45 feet off the ground). This was compelling to me because it reminded me of the photo I took at The Kehoe House in Savannah. I too, took a series of photos of the same window, just like this set that came out of Rolling Hills, and the face captured in both photos at these different locations shared very similar qualities. I have seen photos such as these one other time, and they were taken in the upstairs window at St. Albans in Radford, VA. I am no lighting expert, but of these three photos and three locations, the subject windows are all too high (seemingly) off the ground to be subject to any streetlight or headlights of passing cars.

Normally, I don’t get excited about other people’s “evidence,” but when you see something that matches what you’ve taken yourself, it makes you wonder.

Mostly, it makes me wonder why they are on the outside looking in, and if there can be any implications drawn by their positions. Are they not “allowed” in the building?

 

PW Has Reviewed “America’s Most Haunted Hotels”

http://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-7387-4800-9

I could not be happier right now. I have no idea who reviewed the book, but THANK YOU, whoever you are. Wherever you are.

 

Ghost Brothers at The Fitzpatrick Hotel

“Juwan said he thinks he closed the portal, and now I’ve got to go sleep in there.” — Marcus

Many years ago, Sam Queen and I conducted a mini-investigation at The Fitzpatrick Hotel in Washington, Georgia. I remember investigating the ballroom late at night, and although we did not believe the investigation turned up any “evidence,” we were both impressed by the beauty and the feel of the old hotel, as well as the history of the restoration as evidenced in the book that was shared at the registration desk.

DSCN0908

The Fitzpatrick Hotel, and the small town of Washington, Georgia, itself, is a special place, and I remember the hotel and town fondly. It’s funny, because I couldn’t even tell you what drew me to the place. A feeling, I guess. A rogue hunch. I needed to get into that tower room, and Sam and I needed local places to practice before ultimately researching and traveling for the book we worked on in 2012 (Haunted Asylums, Prisons, and Sanatoriums – released in 2013 by Llewellyn Worldwide).

The whole town is full of history, and old buildings that beg to be investigated.

It pleased me to watch this new paranormal team feature and investigate The Fitzpatrick Hotel. It was educational to learn more of the history of the land and building, because we did not know any of this when we visited. For instance, these interesting little points from the show:

  • Built on top of a cemetery from the late 1700s. They moved the headstones away, but not the bodies. Polly Barclay, hung for killing her husband, may be buried in this cemetery.
  • Woman pushed out of window (Room 307) by lover’s wife in the 1930s. Guests report strange energy in that room. You will see that I took a picture in May 2011 of the keys to Room 307. I had no knowledge of the hotel’s history, but was drawn to specially selecting this room for our investigation. Interesting. 
  • Robert Geiger, Owner of Talk of the Town (the attached restaurant), gave a story that he’s had a basket thrown out of his hands and smashed into a wall.
  • Co-owner, Jim, believes Room 200 is haunted by the Fitzpatrick family.

I thought the show was hilarious! Seeing the guys reluctantly participate in some of the paranormal investigations was a refreshing take on the typical “[Insert mysterious loud noise] Did you hear that?” schtick that unfortunately gets overplayed a bit for the paranormal television genre. The Bloody Mary experiment is something that I have never done, and never will do. I can’t look at myself in the mirror for that long of a time in the dark. It’s just not right.

The guys had flashlights lighting up seemingly in response to questions (you know I love that method!) and batteries were drained in combination with an EVP of a mysterious breath. I thought the Spirit Circle experiment that they conducted in the ballroom was interesting, with the alphabet represented on pieces of paper. It was as though they were participating in a life-size human Ouija Board. Marcus declined to participate in that one, because he didn’t want to “open anything up.”

Strangely, despite voicing that opinion, Marcus was the one who was woken up in the middle of the night because something touched him. He was not having it at all, and woke his team up. It was time to go. Active dreaming, hallucination, or real unexplainable touch? Who can say.

They had a lot of interesting things happen to them that they captured on camera, and they were entertaining to watch. My takeaway from the show? Me, slamming my fist in the mattress while I watched, exclaiming: “Man, I knew that place was haunted!”

If you ask me, that whole town is haunted. Particularly, that white columned Vampire House that smells old. Trust me on that one.

 

Kennebunkport, Maine – America’s Most Haunted Hotels?

Well, no one told Maine that it was summer, because I just left and it was about 60 degrees up there. Refreshing, though! And it smells sweet. You can use your pretty words to trick the tourists into seeing Savannah in the summer, but we all know what it is if we are being honest with ourselves:  stinky, sweltering, and buggy. Yeah, I said it. But I digress.

Also, even though Tybee Island and Savannah are obviously right on THE WATER, our seafood has never tasted as good as the lobster roll that came out of this shack here.

The Clam Shack
The Clam Shack

Kennebunkport is a touristy little spot with plenty of shops/restaurants/galleries, and I imagine it gets very crowded, very fast. We killed a few hours there when the beach got too cold. Check out the locks of love bridge. I guess you two crazy kids are supposed to write your names on the lock, and then throw the key into the ocean. What a bunch of assholes.

Locks of Love Bridge
Locks of Love Bridge – Kennebunkport, Maine

Luckily, if you like to hunt ghosts at night in historic properties, and lounge on blue blood beaches by day, Kennebunkport may be just the spot to spend a long weekend. Don’t tell them I sent you, because some of these places are straight up lips sealed about their ghosties. Pictured below is the Tides by the Sea, which sits on Goose Rocks Beach. The cat is officially out of the bag on this one, since Frances Kermeen wrote about her stay in 2002’s “Ghostly Encounters.” At the time, the building was known/operated as the Tides Inn-by-the-Sea.

The Tides Beach Club
Tides by the Sea – Kennebunkport, Maine

Emma, the former owner of the 1899 hotel (known back then as The New Belvidere), is said to haunt the building, particularly Room 25. In her time, she hosted such guests as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Theodore Roosevelt. According to Kermeen’s interview with the former owners, Emma notoriously had a habit of causing trouble for ill-tempered men who checked into “her” Room (No. 25).

Goose Rocks Beach
Goose Rocks Beach – Kennebunkport, Maine

Colony Hotel

Colony Hotel's Beach
Colony Hotel’s Beach – Kennebunkport, Maine

The Captain Lord Mansion has claims associated with it that involve a female apparition walking through the Lincoln bedroom.

Captain Lord Mansion
Captain Lord Mansion – Kennebunkport, Maine
Captain Lord Mansion 2
Captain Lord Mansion – Kennebunkport, Maine

The Breakwater Inn is situated right off the river (flowing from the ocean) into the port. The hotel is in an interesting position to watch for ghost ships.

Breakwater Inn
Breakwater Inn and Spa – Kennebunkport, Maine

The Captain Fairfield Inn is one that may have a spirit or two, but as of 2013, the owners were NOT open to exploring or encouraging that line of questioning. Still, reports persist. I have several books in my library that cover this house. The lady doth protest too much, methinks.

Captain Fairfield Inn
Captain Fairfield Inn – Kennebunkport, Maine

Walker's Point

As always, our travels are kept in an analog version as well. We use “Play,” by Stealth Journals. Play is an indexed book journal that should be used to record all of your good times!

Scenes From Swamp Rabbit Trail

The Swamp Rabbit Trail in Greenville, SC, is a multi-use trail that is about 21 miles long. Bob and I saw it via bicycle. Our preference was to start at Travelers Rest, pass Furman University, and end at Falls Reedy Park and the Clemson campus. Then, pedal uphill to Main Street and find a cup of coffee before turning back around.

For the paranormally inclined, you may want to stay at the Westin Poinsett, which has been written about in Jason Profit’s “Haunted Greenville,” and just also happens to be centrally located, with easy trail access so you can park onsite and ride to the trail.

As always, we log our adventures inside our “Play” Journal, by Stealth Journals. “Play,” is an indexed book journal by Stealth Journals that should be used to record all of your good times.

Additional Reading:

GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail

http://www.traillink.com/trail/greenville-health-system-swamp-rabbit-trail.aspx

http://greenvilleghost.com/tag/westin-poinsett/

http://southernspiritguide.blogspot.com/2012/01/carolina-cornucopia-haunt-brief.html

 

America’s Most Haunted Hotels

Hotels1

Mock-up for the cover of our first book together! Amazon is taking pre-orders:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0738748005?keywords=america’s%20most%20haunted%20hotels&qid=1458083424&ref_=sr_1_1&sr=8-1 

On My Radar: Lava Hot Springs Inn -Lava Hot Springs, ID

Just musing and adding this location to my wish list of future haunted hotels to investigate/visit.

Why am I so intrigued? I have an idea that a possible sequel to “America’s Most Haunted Hotels: Checking in with Uninvited Guests,” would feature locations that are either in mining towns; built around natural springs; or are former hospitals. The Lava Hot Springs Inn hits 2 out of 3 wish list categories! After everything I’ve seen, I believe that geology plays a huge part in what we refer to as “hauntings” (for lack of a better term), or at least plays a bigger role than I could understand five years ago when I first started traveling and investigating haunted locations.

The hospital theory is based on what I have experienced in connection with traveling and writing my first two books. I felt that the hospitals were more active, even, than the abandoned prisons! One of the theories that you might entertain as to cause is to consider the theory that the people in prisons had probably already given up and resigned themselves to death, while people who died in hospitals went in with the belief that they were going there to be saved. It’s obvious, but I think there is some real truth to the whole trauma/unexpected death theory causing what we refer to as a haunting. This isn’t all there is to it, but it is enough to have captured my attention over the years.

Spec sheet for Lava Hot Springs:

  • Built in the 1920s as the Lava Hot Springs Hospital. (Some original objects from the hospital, including a surgical bed are held at the South Bannock Historical Museum);
  • The curative healing springs remind me of the energy I felt in Eureka Springs, Arkansas (and the 1886 Crescent Hotel);
  • Sacred Native American springs;
  • High levels of “magic” minerals in the water. Manganese has been associated with shape shifting (could be why people see “shadow figures”). Copper is a conductor for electricity and is used in healing. Iron is used for out of body travel.

Further Reading:

http://www.lavahotspringsinn.com

http://www.idahostatejournal.com/members/ghost-adventures-will-explore-lava-hot-springs-inn/article_1a1534f8-3d8e-11e5-b569-ab595a93b2f0.html

http://lavahotsprings.com

 

 

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑